Teamgee H3

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I have been enjoying the H3 on the 32″ Hecs deck, more than I expected and, apart from testing the Boosted with the new big Boa wheels (see the previous post), it is all I have used in the last month.
What makes it fun is the combination of short deck, silent easy push hub-motor, and smooth power controls. The cheap H3 remote is a little too sensitive for my liking, especially on braking, but liveable with. In the end, I picked up another H6 remote and paired that with the H3. The H6 remote is a significant improvement and, given it is relatively inexpensive I highly recommend upgrading to it. The wheel control on the H6 is just better and more progressive than the thumb lever on the H6; breaking is just more controlled and IMO safer.
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The H3 remote controller (let) and the H6 one (right) that has replaced it.
I love the BB with its flexy deck, belt drive and soft wheels for going anywhere, and not worrying too much about bad roads and pavements, but for quick hooning around on nice roads and pavements, nipping to the shop, the short deck and H3 combination is great and always makes me smile as I find myself carving like salmon heading upstream, way more than I can do on the BB.
Before the good points, lets get the negatives out of the way:
  • The H3 remote control is basic and cheap (get the H6 remote) and has a potentially dangerous forward/reverse button prominent on the remote (the H6 is less prominent and less prone to accidental pressing).
  • The single motor top-speed is not powerful enough, it accelerates OK and tops out around 15mpg, but the big issue is that it really struggles to get up steep hills and cannot even sustain its average speed on moderate ones.
The good points:
  • It is inexpensive.
  • It is well made (for the cost) and uses the well-made trucks from the H6.
  • The power control is smooth and progressive; an easy e-skate to get confident on quickly. No disconnects or connection issues.
  • It is easy to fit (see link).
  • There is minimal resistance (this is just a single hub-motor), so pushing off, using it like a conventional longboard is easy, you can even pump it if you want.
In summary: easy to fit, just works, but struggles with hills.
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The range I have been getting from the 2200mah battery is just over 6 miles when out easy cruising and occasionally hitting the 15mph top speed (for the record I am 185lb/84kg). Charging time from empty is roughly 1.5 hours.
Like the H6, the H3 remote has a hard-switch two-setting speed limiter which works well with my 8-year-old and restricting his top speed.
Regarding the price, my unit is an advanced one (paid for with my own money) but Teamgee has not put this up for general sale, so I don’t know the official cost. If it was me, looking at the alternatives, I would happily pay $250-300 for this unit.
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Final word, I have ordered an exotic 31″ 121c Aileron carbon-fiber deck (19″/48cm wheelbase) for it to live on longer term. If Teamgee bring out a more powerful drive version, I will get it.
aileron
Nice one Teamgee.
(just redesign your remote and that forward/reverse button and stick a more powerful motor on it).

Teamgee H6 & H3 remote issue

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Teamgee H3 remote, with the SHIFT button on top

I really like our Teamgee H6 and H3, but both remotes have a feature that has now caused me to spill twice (thankfully only minor grazes).

Both the H6 and H3 remotes have a ‘SHIFT’ button for switching between forward & reverse. If this button is accidentally/unknowingly pressed and you just push off (I always push off instinctively, being a long-time border) and then bring in the power to continue riding, when the button has been pressed into reverse, the board shoots backward and you fly off.

This happened once when the remote had been in my pocket and another time when my 8-year-old thought it would be a laugh to give the board back to me in reverse (lesson learned). I now ALWAYS test the direction of the board first before setting off, which I recommend others do.

I have passed my comment on to Teamgee and, as usual, they responded quickly (I have found them very good to communicate with), and said they will look into the design.

As said, I really like the boards and would happily buy another – it is just if you have a current model, or an H9 on order, check before setting off (especially if you have an 8-year-old with an evil sense of humor!).

First Impressions of the Curfboard

 

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So finally got some time out on the new Curfboard this weekend with its unique carving front truck (the rear truck is a standard RKP design).

As mentioned when it first arrived, the whole board is well made; the 33″ (84cm) deck with a 62cm wheelbase is nice, with a good level of flex for me as an 85kg rider, the trucks feel quality and the 70mm wheels, which feel around 82a, are well finished with no obvious crack/splinter faults.

Link to Curfboard Ad Video

Curfboard video of the front trucks working

I had a couple of questions on Reddit Longboard forum, one “was it a gimmick?” and two, “does it feel divey?“. The first is “no” and the second is “yes”. I don’t feel it is a gimmick at all, it is different from a conventional longboard and, for me, very enjoyable to use in the right situation, and that is a key point I will come back to. “Divey” because there is no rebound to work with, no force to exert against to make the movement more progressive; there are no bushings to push down against (except on the rear truck). I get why not, and the principal involved; I may get used to it more, but I miss that opposing force to give a more progressive feel. It carves well, in the right situation, and pumps well, but I still miss some progressive movement in the trucks.

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The key here as mentioned before is “in the right situation” – this front truck, for me, is in its element on a gentle to moderate hill, where you want to carve; with an advantage over some of my other caving boards, in that it does not need much road width – it can carve tight. On that gentle long, but narrow road, this is a near perfect weapon.

I would, however, not fast downhill on this; speed wobbles for me came quick and its short quick carving does not slow the experience down nor dampen the wobbles. I will choose my hills very carefully when out on the Curfboard. I did not try any sliding nor am encouraged to do so, but this might be my inexperience and sliding capability.

Another aspect I would recommend being careful of is just pushing off – if the front foot weight, and your balance, is not perfectly balanced, the board will dive immediately. First time out and, every now and then, this caught me out – this is a truck that you very much need to build your confidence on carefully. Consequently, unlike some of my rock solid boards like the Zenit AB, this is a board I would not take to casually, half-sleep, cruise around town. I know the local roads and paths I will use this on and look forward to it, but only those. Sadly I don’t have a smooth pump track near me, as I suspect this would also be its natural home but will search one out just for the experience.

Finally, coming back to the lack of resistance progression, I can’t help feeling that there could be a future development of this truck to add an element of progressive resistance, and if so, I will be at the front of the queue.

Nicely made Curfboard.

More Information:

 

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