E-boards, trucks & bushings

Red 93a Paris bushing

With rain outside (yet again), I changed the bushings on the Boosted Dual. The stock bushings are apparently 86a durometer, which in theory are too soft for me at 85kg (187lb). I say “in theory” because they don’t feel like 86a, they feel much firmer; however, they are easy to change, so why not. I had some spare Paris made barrels, so put in 93a board-side and 90a roadside. I may step-up to 94a+93a, but will try the 93a+90a combination first.

UPDATE: After trying it (I am 85kg), I moved up to the 94a+93a combination and have settled on that.

I used Paris bushings for now (the 94a’s I have are DohDoh), as they are what I had spare, but any good make – Venom, Oust, Blood Orange, Riptide etc. – would work. I see a lot of e-boarders talking about Orantang Nipples (I guess it is the Loaded marketing machine again), but they are too soft for me for downhill and speed, even their supposed “hard” ones are only 89a.

I like to run the e-boards like conventional downhill boards, based on the premise that both need to be stable at speed: two barrels and firm, rather than my usual barrel+cone cruising set-up on the conventional push boards. In simple terms, barrels have more surface area over cones and will hold their shape more.



With e-boards and their high-speeds, my preference would be to not run bushings at all and use spring trucks, like the Trampas or Seismic G5s. A polyurethane bushing has a complex job to do, given all the multi-dimensional forces it has to react against. Their dominance of the truck world comes from skateboarding, where they are cheap and make truck manufacturing easy; but skateboarding is not e-boarding, especially at speed. For now, however, I will live with the Boosted and Yuneec running conventional longboard trucks, but if there is ever an upgrade option, or I replace one of the boards with a Nottingham made Trampa or some exotic derivative, I will do it and go for springs.


Finally, I see a lot of people jumping into e-boarding having not ridden push boards before, not a problem if people take it easy to learn e-boarding and build up the speed carefully. One thing, however, that does become apparent, with those who have not push boarded before, is that lack of awareness of how important bushings are and the need to use ones with a durometer that matches the rider and type of riding. Given how inexpensive and simple they are to change, there is a need to get greater awareness in the community and new riders using what is right for them; especially, given the job of a bushing is to keep you out of a hospital and enjoying the ride.

Riptide bushings (note – there is no color standard, all manufacturers use different colors for their various durometer ratings).



Electric: Mellow Boards


I have been looking at getting a new electric board to go alongside the early Yuneec Go my older son uses.

My concern with all the electric boards is support for when things break, as looking at all of them, and talking to my friends with electric boards, they are all new designs, early generations from new companies; plus, living outside the US, support is not always easy or just nonexistent.

Mellow Boards (www.mellowboards.com) caught my attention as they are a German company and, hence, support should be easier for me in the UK; plus, I like the concept of attaching the unit to a longboard of my choice. Also looks very promising with the in-hub motors and swappable battery. Time to do some more research and find someone with one.

Re support in the UK (proper support, not just return to Amazon), so far I have found I can get it locally for from just two: Evolve and Slick Revolution.

Most of the high-profile names right now, getting good reviews: Boosted, InBoard etc. are sadly still US only companies that will ship (with excessive import duties) to the UK and Europe, but not offer anything more. The reality is, that it is still early days for these start-up companies and most don’t yet have their distribution and international retail networks organised. Give it a few years and those of us outside the US should be better served, however, it does make you wonder how many of the current start-ups will be around in a few years time, which is another concern I would have in buying any electric board right now.