Living with a v2 Boosted

Given the popularity of Boosted, and my continued admiration of our v2 Dual, I thought it might help to get some information together on living with a v2 Dual (or Dual+), starting with regular checks, maintenance, and wheel hacks/options.


img_20180128_161250-e1523123246487.jpg

Set-up & Go

There is not much really to set-up on the Duals, a quick general check of the wheels, nuts (optimum tightness), battery status and you are kind of good to go. Oh, yes… read the manual (LOL). It is worth understanding how to set the speed level and turn it all on/off (and the ‘quick-off’ – wheel fully back on the remote while switching off).

The one thing that I would consider changing early if you are a lighter or heavier rider, are the bushings. Boosted say they are 86a (common with most new boards) but they feel stiffer to me, like 89-90a – not an issue, just an observation. Try them, but if you want to change them just get (they are inexpensive) some various different ones from the usual well regarded makes: Bones, BloodO, Oust, Riptide, Venom etc.

Personally, I would set up the bushings like a downhill longboard, with dual barrels or eliminators, but that is just a preference for stability at speed over-aggressive carving.

longboard-bushing-durometer-guide
There is more on bushings here:
If you don’t have them already, it would be worth getting a standard skate T-tool and a 4mm Allen-key, plus a couple of spare belts – better to be prepared (and again they are inexpensive).
t-tool

Checks & Maintenance

Of all our e-boards, the Boosted v2 is the easiest to maintain: it needs nothing more than a few standard tools, spare parts are easy to obtain and it all comes apart nice and easy for your average Joe like me. Perfect, thank you Boosted Boards.

Regular Checks

When we take any of the boards (conventional or electric) out of the under-stairs cupboard, I always do the same quick 30-second check with a standard skate T-tool in hand. At the end of the day, the last thing I want when traveling at 10, 20mph or more is anything jamming, disconnecting, losing grip or breaking.

What I do (usually no more than a minute):

  • Check the grip-tape is not coming off.
    (turn over the deck)
  • Trucks are screwed tight to the deck – no wobble or any movement.
  • Bushings are not deformed or cracked.
  • Kingpin nuts are not too loose or tight (at their optimum)
  • Wheels not torn or cut (and about to shred).
  • Wheel nuts not too tight or loose, no lateral movement on the wheel.
  • Wheels bearings run smooth and quiet (each wheel) and not rusted.

For the Boosted (and the other e-boards), I then spend a few extra minutes on:

  • Battery status, is it charged sufficiently – the remote controller and board.
  • Ensuring all exposed electrical connectors are tightly connected.
  • All compartments (battery and controller) are tight to the deck.
  • The motors & belts being tight and aligned.
  • No belt wear or damage – any obvious wear or damage and I will change them (they are inexpensive).
  • Remote control wheel/trigger moving freely (not switched on).
  • I then switch on the board and put on the ground (I am not stood on it) to give it some resistance; followed by pairing the remote and a quick forward and back of the board on the ground.

Regarding charging the board, I generally leave it and the remote fully-charged after each trip out, primarily as I am not sure when it will go back out. I certainly will not leave the battery fully drained for any time.

Charging

Although I know of no fires and problems with leaving the board charging for a long-time (trusting the auto charger cut-out), personally I would still not take the chance of a faulty charger, or using a cheap copy charger, and leave it charging overnight.

I either charge it while I am around (it is a quick charging board and does not take long) or use an inexpensive timer-plug to make sure.

multi-woods-timers-50030-64_1000

 

The board with standard-mode battery usually needs an hour or less, but if I use a timer after a long run I set it to 2 hours which always has been sufficient.

Note: Boosted quote: “Every 15 minutes of charge time equates to about a mile of range on both standard and extended range models.

Long-term Maintenance (or not)

Longer-term this may come back to bite me, but I don’t really do long-term maintenance as such and have never felt the need to get the board serviced by Boosted (now done in Europe by SickBoards.nl).  Instead, I just check it regularly, usually every time I go out with it and usually when stopped in a cafe, and deal with things as they need to be dealt with, then occasionally I disassemble the wheels, trucks, and motor-assembly to clean it.
Belts, bushings, and bearings are all inexpensive items and how long they last will depend on your riding conditions; lots of stones, dust and water and you are going to get less from them, hence, I don’t have any set replace-at-X-miles guidelines.

Belts

If there is a nick or damage to the belt I will change it – they are inexpensive (the last ones I bought were £4 each) and I don’t want the risk of a belt tearing and jamming the wheel while moving.

You can get Boosted replacement belts or use third-party ones, as it is just a standard specification timing belt (well done again Boosted). Some of the alternatives that I know of:

Note if you are ordering a 225-3M belt, make sure you get the “-15” and not “-6” version, i.e. the 15mm width and not the narrower 6mm (or any other width).

Bearings

If bearings sound rusty or dirty I just replace them. I used to clean bearings, but some Bones Reds, Bronson etc. are relatively inexpensive and work perfectly, even the big inner drive bearings are not expensive, so I have got lazy and just put new ones in; but if you want to clean them, go ahead.

The stock Boosted bearings seem good quality and with some occasional cleaning should last longer than the motor and battery, really the life of the board. Equally, I can’t see replacing them with something more (pointlessly) exotic, like some ceramics, producing any performance benefits given the resistance of a belt an motor.

If you do want to change bearings, all the bearings are standard skate bearings, except for the larger inner drive one, which is a 6903RS (note the V1s are a 6804ZZ). Simply Bearings (UK) or BearingBoys (UK) sell the big one (as do many other shops). You can also get the official Boosted replacement bearing kit in Europe now from Sick Boards.nl (Netherlands) so no longer have to import.

Additionally, don’t use a bearing with a built-in spacer for the outside of the drive wheels, the drive wheels use a custom long spacer (not standard) given the pulley is attached to the inside of the wheel. The length of this spacer is specific for a bearing with no built-in spacer, a flat bearing. So excellent bearings, like the Zealous Greens and Bones Race Reds, won’t work in the drive wheels. Stick to a standard flat bearing.

Bushings

Bushings only get replaced if there is a tear, fracture or they are deformed (not yet had this on the Boosted, just some of my regular longboards). Again they are inexpensive, so why not.

Wheels

I have yet to wear out, or really damage the wheels, so not had to replace those, other than to change them for a different ride – speed, clearance etc. (see the section below on wheel options).

General

Other than replacing things that need it, I just strip the V2 down, clean it and put it back together ensuring everything is as tight as it should be.

I will do some pictures, possibly a video, but my order is:
  1. All wheels off, bearings, spacers and speed-rings/washers off (don’t lose those speed-rings!). Wiggle the drive-wheels and turn them to help with the belts off.
  2. Skid-plate off and motor assembly off – just removed the screws.
  3. Take apart the rear truck assembly: kingpin-nut off, bushings, cups and hanger off (and remember to clean inside the hanger cup).
  4. Front truck apart, same bushings, hanger, cups etc.
  5. Clean all cables.

I leave the controller and battery box in place and just make sure they are tight to the deck. All really easy (thank you Boosted), just make sure you don’t lose any of the little screws or washers and put the bushings top-side and bottom-side back on in the right order.

Boosted’s Youtube channel includes videos on:

  • Belt changing & tensioning
  • Replacing skid-plates
  • Replacing wheels & bearings (includes a good tip for getting the big bearing out)
  • Replacing the battery
If you want to know what a V2 looks like after 5K miles board (yes, 5000 miles), here is /u/laxtorre with his video of his very well used V2: YouTube Link

 

Riding Out

boosted-electric-skateboard-dualplus

First and foremost, take it easy and always wear a helmet.

Most of the time I am riding my boards around London and Richmond, where public transport is easy and getting a broken board home is easy (only happened once); hence, don’t carry anything with me other than a standard skateboard T-tool & 4mm Allen-key to tighten things up that might come loose (I usually check in whatever cafe I stop at).

On the rare occasions that I want to take a few items with me, just in case, I then carry the following:

  • Skate T-tool & 4mm Allen-key
  • Spare belts
  • Chargers (if going more than a standard battery distance)

I don’t have the XR (Extra Range) battery fitted currently because I don’t need it and I like the current weight feel of the board. Virtually all of my riding is social (occasional commute, but rarely is that fun), out with my sons stopping at cafes, 5-7 miles is plenty; I have yet to actually run the battery right down.

Carrying

If not riding it, I just carry the Dual as I would any longboard, on its side with the wheels away from me, it is heavier but the balance is the same. A few people complain about the grip-tape damaging their clothes, but in many years of longboarding I have never experienced any real damage, but that might be me just wearing bad inexpensive clothing!

carry boosted

If traveling with the board, I use a left-over stroller travel-bag (from a Microlite stroller). Fits nicely and protects the boards from scratches etc. I see a lot of them sold used on ebay and other sites, so a good bargain if you see one or similar.

mlttravel-bag


 

Wheel Hack Options

hm-boosted-_32-

The Boosted v2’s Orangatang (Loaded) 80mm Kegel wheels are excellent wheels and I run them on a number of our conventional longboards (inc. with Kaliber Affe and Zenit AB decks) for sometime; however, if you want more clearance on the Boosted for the belt-guards then you have a number of options/hacks to use larger wheels. To me, it seems pointless to put smaller wheels on the v2s, as you are just going to scrape it more frequently and cause damage.

Some of these are just larger replacement wheels that just directly replace the Kegel, using the same pulleys and belts, and others are pulley and belt kits to use larger wheels with a different core (fastening to the pulley).

In using larger wheels, and different pulleys from the standard 56t (56 teeth on the wheel, with 17 teeth on the motor), it is important to note that you are can be impacting the gearing and, therefore, the top-speed and torque – usually only in minor amounts, but it is worth considering in your choice.
In general:

  • Stock pulley + larger wheel = increase in top-speed and decrease in torque/acceleration.
  • Smaller pulley (aka “speed pulley”) + larger wheel = greater increase in top-speed and decrease in torque/acceleration.
  • Larger pulley + larger wheel = similar top-speed and torque/acceleration

Regarding replacement pulleys, I would be careful of 3D-printed ones, as opposed to traditional injection molded, depending on what they are printed with they may wear out quicker – not a major issue, but you may want to check them more frequently than the stock ones if they are 3D-printed. You can also 3D-print your own pulleys and some of the websites listed below share blueprints, as well as sell the pulley printed.

One of the other benefits of using different wheels is that you can use non-slick wheels, either tread-cut versions (“harfangs“) or specifically molded-tread wheels. I am highly skeptical of either of these wheel versions helping with wet surfaces, as they just won’t work like a rubber tire with water, but I can see how they would help with the likes of gravel and light rough/grass.

It is important to note, that in changing wheel or pulley you may also need to change the belts, belt cover-guards and/or motor covers.

The following are the wheel options I have found to date (will add more as I find them).

Wheel Options

Summary of wheels (that I know of), that can be fitted to v2 Duals:

Using stock pulleys

  • 76mm 79a Ahmyo Akasha, white
  • 80mm 80a Orangatang Kegel, orange/green (stock on V2s)
  • 80mm 80a Orangatang Kegel, orange/green Harfangs
  • 80mm 83a Orangatang Kegel, purple/green
  • 80mm 78a Boosted Board Lunar, orange (stock on Mini S)
  • 80mm 78a Boosted Board Lunar, grey (stock on Mini X)
  • 85mm 80a Orangatang Caguama, orange/green
  • 85mm 83a Orangatang Caguama, purple/green
  • 85mm Boosted Board Stratus, grey (stock on Stealth)
  • 85mm Boosted Board Stratus, orange (stock on Plus)
  • 90mm 78a Ollin Popoca, black
  • 90mm 83a Boa Hatchling, various colours and harfangs
  • 90mm 77a Enertion R-Spec, black
  • 97mm 77a Enertion R-Spec, black
  • 100mm 77a Enertion Cross-over (molded-tread), black
  • 100mm 83a Boa Constrictor, white or red (normal or red harfang cut-treads)

With replacement pulleys

  • 76mm 75a ABEC 11 Flywheels, green/orange
  • 83mm 88a Slick Revolution Electric Skateboard, black, green or red
  • 83mm 75a Metroboard-ABEC 11, clear red
  • 83mm 75a ABEC 11 Flywheels, green/orange
  • 83mm 76a Evolve GT Street, orange/black
  • 90mm 75a ABEC 11 Flywheels, green/orange
  • 97mm 76a Evolve GT, black/white
  • 97mm 75a ABEC 11 Flywheels, green/orange
  • 97mm 77a Metroboard-ABEC 11, red/black
  • 107mm 75a ABEC 11 Flywheels, green/orange
  • 107mm 74a Evolve-ABEC 11, black/yellow
  • 100mm 78a MBS All Terrain (molded-treads), black, green, orange or blue
  • 110mm 85a Slick Revolution Rough Stuff (molded-treads), red or black
  • 6” Pneumatic tires

Personal comment

Evolve owners have always had a number of wheel options, it was one of the things that initially attracted me to Evolve; but now Boosted owners have their own options for street wheels. We still have to see a few more off-road options come out, but right now life is much better.

Fitting an off-set core wheel, with the same core as the Kegel is really easy and the way most people IMO should go. It is a straight swap, nothing more to buy, replace or trim. Given we now have easy options for 80, 85, 90 and 100mm there seems to be little advantage in going the center-set ABEC11-core route unless you want the fun of the project.

The easy options:

  • 80mm Orangatang Kegals
  • 80mm Boosted Board Lunar
  • 85mm Orangatang Cagumas
  • 85mm Boosted Board Stratus
  • 90mm Boa Hatchlings
  • 100mm Boa Constrictors

Makers/Sellers

1. Booster Box

Booster Box

USA based Booster Box sells stock and speed pulley kits for the ABEC 11 Flywheels (wheels need to be bought separately), which includes belts and covers; plus motor covers for the Ollin Popoca wheels (see specifics for the wheels below).

2. Shapeways

shapeways

USA based Shapeways sells both stock an speed pulleys, plus various guards and skid plates, for the ABEC 11 Flywheels and Evolve wheels (wheels need to be bought separately).

3. EBoard Hacks

DSC_6785

USA based Eboard Hacks has a large selection of both stock an speed pulleys, plus belts, for Kegels, Evolve, ABEC 11 Flywheels, MBS molded-treads and 6″ Pneumatics (wheels need to be bought separately).

4. Slick Revolution

hm-boosted-_32-

UK based Slick Revolution will sell from June 2018 a pulley and belt guard kit for its own 83mm street wheels, large 110mm Rough Stuff molded-tread wheels and the ABEC 11 Flywheels (ABECs need to be bought separately).

5. Eboard Stuff

eboard-stuff-abec-kit.jpg

USA based Eboard Stuff sell kits, including pulleys and wheels, for the 97 and 107mm ABEC 11 Flywheels. Interestingly this using a 68t pulley so should retain the Duals’ top-speed and torque/acceleration with the 97mm wheels and give increase/decrease by 10% on the 107mm wheels. They currently use 3D printed pulleys but are offering a free replacement for late in the year when they move to injection-molded.

6. Boa Wheels

 

USA based Boa Wheels sells two wheels which use the same core design as the Kegels and therefore can be fitted as a direct replacement using the stock pulley, the 90mm 83a Hatchling and the larger 100mm 83a Constrictor,  normal or harfang cut-treads.

Here is how to fit the 100mm Constrictors: Boas on the Boosted

7. Ollin Board Company

4some

USA based Ollin Board Compay, similar to Boa Wheels, sells its own wheel, the 90mm 78a Popoca, which uses the same core hole design as the Kegals, but is centre-set core.

8. ABEC 11 Wheels

ABEC

USA based ABEC 11 sells 5 sizes (76, 83, 90, 97 & 107mm) of its 75a Flywheel, the most commonly used alternative wheel to the Kegels. All will need a replacement pulley to work with the v2 Duals and potentially a replaced or trimmed motorguard given this is a center-set core.

9. Metroboard

New-Metroboard-ABEC11-97-mm-Red-Wheels3

USA based Metroboard sell two ABEC 11 cobranded wheels, an 83mm 75a in clear red and a larger 97mm 77a in solid retro red. Will need a replacement pulley to work with the v2 Duals.

10. Evolve

Evolve_Skateboards_Black_GT_97mm_76A_Stone_ground_set_of_4_4_large

The big e-board maker Evolve sells three sizes of wheel: its own 83, & 97mm GT wheels and a 107mm made with ABEC 11. All will need a replacement pulley.

11. MBS Europe

13406-mbsallterrainlongboardwheel-set-green.png

UK based MBS sells four colours of its 100mm 78a All Terrain molded-tread wheel. A specific replacement pulley is needed.

12. Enertion

 

Australian based company Enertion, similar to Ollin and Boa, sells three wheels compatible with the stock Kegel pulley. 77a Street wheels at 90 and 97mm, and 77a ‘Cross-overs’ (molded-tread) at 100mm. Note, be careful to order the ones for other boards and not the ‘Ouwheels’ for their own Raptor2 board.

13. Alkamist/Ahmyo

Alkemist3

French based company Alkamist sells their 76mm 79a Ahmyo Akasha wheels with the same core as the Kegels and there will work with the existing pulley.

14. Orangatang

caguama wheels

Besides the stock superb 80mm Kegels, Orangatang has now brought out a second slightly larger wheel with the same off-set core (needing no new pulley or motor guard) the 85mm Caguama – which looks very cool. Available, like the stock Kegels, as 80a (Orange with green core) or slightly harder 83a (Purple with green core).

15. Boosted Board

Boosted-Boards-Gen-3-Press-2-1

Finally, Boosted have now brought out their own set of wheels for the new Stealth, Plus, and Mini boards, which are compatible with the V2s. Two 80mm wheels called the Lunar in orange and grey and a slightly larger 85mm Status, also in orange and grey.

Link to Boosted’s Compatability Chart

===