Bearing Grease

breaing greeese

Found this interesting and very helpful video on bearing grease from the excellent guys at Longboard Technology (OuterPlanet).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hsXhSao7EEw

Youtube Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hsXhSao7EEw

Summary of their recommendations:

  • Schaeffer 274 Moly Extreme Pressure – most waterproof, Nano MOLY Anti-Friction, very cheap.
  • SuperLube High Temp Extreme Pressure – waterproof, PTFE Anti-friction, a little expensive.
  • Archoil AR8300 Severe Duty Nanoceramic – very high water resistance, nano ceramic anti-friction, VERY expensive.
  • Bones Speed Cream – gold standard conventional bearing lubricant. Low water resistance, no anti-friction additives, extremely good ease of use, widely available, cheap.

Lots of other interesting videos of there, especially on truck design.

outerplanet2

Playing with a Boosted

boosted

Every cloud has a silver lining (sorry Graham)… I have an estimated guest in the stable, a dual-motor Boosted. My friend, Graham, has unfortunately broken his leg and can’t board for a while, so has lent me his prized Boosted electric longboard… now known (unfairly) as “leg-breaker“; note: it could have been any board that caused his tumble, it was not down to anything particular with the Boosted.

First impression (compared to the Yuneec we have and a borrowed Evolution) is of a nicely balanced (flex-stiffness) board, great wheels (the big 8cm Kegels) and a smooth controller; however, the controller catches me out with its deadman’s trigger. If the trigger is released, which is easy to do, the board slows down to a halt; not really an issue, just something to get used to.

Will step it up from baby mode this weekend, if the weather is good.

UPDATE: The Boosted is staying, now mine 🙂

Bearings – how much to spend?

bearings2
As a casual easy-going longboarder, and 6 boards in, I was thinking: “what have I learned?” – the full subject/answer is for a much longer post in the future, but I just wanted to cover one aspect now: bearings.
Alongside bushings, to match my weight and style, the one thing I almost certainly will keep changing on any future boards I buy complete, is the bearings. As a casual longboarder, not pushing the envelope in dance, freestyle or downhill, can I tell the difference between bad and good bearings, cheap and more costly? The answer is very firmly “yes”.
So far we have used bearings from Atom, Venom, Bones, Oust, Bronson and some unknown unbranded makes and I may not be able to tell the difference between makes, but I can certainly tell the difference between cheap and bad, and some costing a bit more. Is it worth spending a little more on your bearings? The answer for me is “yes, but not too much more”.
So, how much is spending a little more? Well, the bearings that have all come with complete boards have been quite frankly rubbish  – “rubbish”, being that the board, under load (remember any ol’ bearing can spin forever without any load) does not travel as far and is just harder work. At the end of play, I feel more tired and just have not got as much done nor had as much fun. I guess it is simply an easy item for the makers of complete boards, in a very price competitive market, to use to help keep their costs down – there is no visible branding needed and in a shop people just flick the wheels (unloaded).
We first bought £8-12 bearings to replace the bad ones, but found some of them to not be too much better – I doubt it is a make/brand issue, it is just a consequence of the manufacturing costs. The step change in improvement has come from spending a bit more: £20-30 bearings – for us: Bones Race Reds, Bronson G3, Zealous & Oust. This is where the effort, speed, the run etc. have all been significantly better and overall just made the boards more fun to use.
On the next board (oh’ yes more to come… :-> ) I am going to try out some more expensive again Swiss and Ceramic bearings, just to see if they make an even bigger difference – I suspect not, but it will be fun to see.
bearings-orthographic1.jpg
UPDATE:
Crunchie makes a good point, which is that a new bearing will generally be better than an old expensive one. Our philosophy is now to change bearings when they start to show issues (sounds rough, don’t run smooth etc.), frequently, if necessary. Consequently, I am not going to spend a lot on bearings, given we may replace them often – £20-30 for a set works for us.

Hecs Decks Fish Arrives

My Hecs Decks Fish, well that’s my name for it until Hector comes up with a real name.

Hecs fish1

Beautifully made with a bubinga topping and bottoming, with two walnut layers (yes, I am watching great British Bake Off right now). Lovely balance of stiff over flex.

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Walnut in the beautiful layering

I put on some spare 180 Paris V2s and my Hawg Mini Monsters. The 180s are a little too wide and will get some 165s for it long term. Will also Lucid spray-grip it.

Very pleased; thanks, Hector.

Ordered New Deck: Hecs Decks

hecsdecks-skateboard

Sometimes the stars align and you have to seize the day (to mix as many metaphors as I can) – I contacted a few makers over the last few days looking for a new deck with a single or double kicktail, including the small UK maker (are we supposed to call small makers “boutique makers”?) Hecs Decks, who shared that they have just started making an evolution of their short cruiser; yet to be named, but with a kicktail. So, hey, seize the day and ordered one with a gloss Bubinga finish. 🙂

hecs decks hector

Details from the very helpful Hector (hey, just got it: Hec’tor):

  • 835mm length (33″) with a wheelbase of 505mm.
  • Big round tail with a mellow angle.
  • Mellow concave which curves towards a peak just forward from the centre of the board.
  • 12 ply with thin layers (“so that it’s stiffer”)

Photos of his stunning walnut first cut (and what convinced me).

Have a spare set of Paris 180cm V2s and some 4President wheels to try on it when it arrives, but may drop down to some slightly narrower trucks. Will see what it is like before deciding on what to do with the face/top; which is probably just leave it and only ride it easy and dry, like the Hackbrett, although I do have some ideas on fancy grip patterns after gripping the Kaliber.

So that’s a Zenit AB, a Jungle Board pintail and now a Hecs Decks all to come and join the growing family collection… wupps 🙂